2013 Microloan Recipients Visited

Some Microloan recipients for 2013 were visited in their homes. The success of the program was reinforced each time. Walking from one home to the next usually provided other photo opportunities.

This young lad was relaxing in his bed as we spoke with his mother about her loan.

This young lad was relaxing in his bed as we spoke with his mother about her loan.

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The women enjoyed looking at and buying many of the products produced by this microloan recipient.

The women enjoyed looking at and buying many of the products produced by this microloan recipient.

This lady started by making atul, a hot breakfast drink. She used the profits to expand into weaving and is now doing quite well as a business women.

This lady started by making atul, a hot breakfast drink. She used the profits to expand into weaving and is now doing quite well as a business women.

Jewellery making is a common business started or expanded by microloan recipients. Each recipient also receives training in business procedures and many other life skills.

Jewellery making is a common business started or expanded by microloan recipients. Each recipient also receives training in business procedures and many other life skills.

Adding a new line to the power system. Yes, it is in his mouth.

Adding a new line to the power system. Yes, it is in his mouth.

Weaving is a time consuming job, but provides an income for many women.

Weaving is a time consuming job, but provides an income for many women.

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Fayne and Catherine Bullen Honoured and Valentines Cards from Warminster

Fayne and Catherine Bullen, founding members of Paso Por Paso, were honoured by the Tierra Linda School on Thursday February 5th, 2014. Fayne unveiled a plaque recognizing his key role in the construction of 7 classrooms at the school as well as other improvements since 2005. Valentines made by the Warminster students were delivered to the students at Tierra Linda and Paso members accepted the valentines from the Guatemalan students for Warminster.

Fayne meeting some students.

Fayne meeting some students.

David presents the valentines made by Beth Kudar and her students at Warminster.

David presents the valentines made by Beth Kudar and her students at Warminster.

Fayne accepts valentines made by the Tierra Linda students. They will be delivered to their twin school, Warminster Elementary School.

Fayne accepts valentines made by the Tierra Linda students. They will be delivered to their twin school, Warminster Elementary School.

A warm greeting from thestudents at Tierra Linda.

A warm greeting from thestudents at Tierra Linda.

Fayne and Catherine Bullen honoured.

Fayne and Catherine Bullen honoured.

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Since Paso Por Paso has affiliated with Tierra Linda school, mud floors have been replaced with concrete, 7 classrooms have been added, school room furniture has been supplied, a kitchen has been built, a retaining wall has been constructed to protect against erosion, washrooms have been improved and windows and doors have been upgraded. Future projects include a safer water filtration system as well as a variety of nutritional programs.

Since Paso Por Paso has affiliated with Tierra Linda school, mud floors have been replaced with concrete, 7 classrooms have been added, school room furniture has been supplied, a kitchen has been built, a retaining wall has been constructed to protect against erosion, washrooms have been improved and windows and doors have been upgraded. Future projects include a safer water filtration system as well as a variety of nutritional programs.

Sharon from Mayan Families thanks Fayne and Catherine for all of their help since 2005.

Sharon from Mayan Families thanks Fayne and Catherine for all of their help since 2005.

A traditional dance was performed by junior students.

A traditional dance was performed by junior students.

Youngsters in their traditional clothing entertain the Paso members with a folk dance.

Youngsters in their traditional clothing entertain the Paso members with a folk dance.

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Paso Por Paso Sponsors 24 students for the 2014 school year

Gillian sponsors Irma Cecilia and had a chance to meet her and her mother.

Gillian sponsors Irma Cecilia and had a chance to meet her and her mother.

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The grade 1 to 6 students with their parent, valentine and some of the Paso directors/members.

The grade 1 to 6 students with their parent, valentine and some of the Paso directors/members.

The grade 7 to 11 students with parent, valentine and Paso directors/members.

The grade 7 to 11 students with parent, valentine and Paso directors/members.

Working on arts and crafts for Valentine's Day

Working on arts and crafts for Valentine’s Day

Most students are accompanied by a parent and sometimes a younger sibling. They enjoy having photos of them taken.

Most students are accompanied by a parent and sometimes a younger sibling. They enjoy having photos of them taken.

Roger talking with a student and her family.

Roger talking with a student and her family.

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Maya Student: Living on the Edge

Anastasia Xon and her Family with Pat and Roger Pretty of PASO POR PASO

Canadians would consider Anastasia Xon’s life ‘living on the edge’. She is used to it and has been doing so since she was a child.

Anastasia is 37 years old. She and her husband and five children live in Panajachel in the upstairs of Guillermo’s mothers house. The municipality cut off the electricity three months ago. There is a penalty that just keeps accumulating until they can afford to restore service.

Even at that Anastasia is up at 5:00 am every day to do the laundry before nine when the water supply is turned off.

Millions of Maya survive on a few torillas and a little salt, often all they can manage each day for food. Getting enough food became a serious problem for Anastasia recently. Her husband Guillermo is allergic to bee stings.

His breathing has been affected and as a fisherman he can no longer dive. A few weeks ago the Bomberos, the Fire Department, rushed him to the hospital following a diving incident fishing to feed his family.

Guillermo needs an epi-pen, but no one here seems to have heard of it. He also needs a medical alert bracelet; if he is bitten and has an allergic reaction, people will just think he’s drunk. Or worse, Anastasia says the doctors tell her his life is at risk.

Is it surprising that he also has high blood pressure? There is no money to pay for medicine.

This past week visiting Paso Por Paso members arranged to have Anastasia’s electricity restored, and for Mayan Families.org to supply Anastasia with bag of corn for torillas and a supply of beans and rice.

There is another connection with Anastasia.

During the past year she has been a Canada-Maya Scholar. The Orillia Committee thought that she was graduating in November with a bachelor’s degree in Social Work and that Anastasia would then be able to seek a well paying job.

The fact is that she was eligible at this point in her studies for a technical certificate. But she would have to pay Q10,000 to sit the exams. Further, she needs two more years to complete the degree or face an increased cost for every new course she might want to study.

Anastasia’s Canada-Maya Scholarship has been extended for two more years. When she graduates she will be part of less than 1% of Maya women with a degree.
Anastasia speaks excellent English and Spanish. She also is fluent in three Maya languages. She has worked since she was nine. She knows first hand about poverty and she puts her faith in education and determination.

There are holes in Anastasia and Guillermos’s metal roof. There is no railing on the stairs. The plastic on the open windows is ragged. But soon there will be electric lights, a little more food, and the chance to study at the university.

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Students Say Conditions Critical

The global economic storm and a summer of tropical rains have hit the country and our students hard.“In Panajachel, we are living a critical economic situation…, writes Business student Oliva Lopez.

Tropical storm Agatha did Q378 million (about $54,000,000) to agriculture, livestock and food production. Crops most affected are maize, beans, banana and plantain. There will be shortages.

“The roads in and out of Panajachel became virtually impassable because of the mudslides,” Patti Mort of Mayan Families reports.

“Things have not improved since the rains stopped. “The road to Solola (the main administrative town in the area) is completely closed for repairs and it is a two hour trip (instead of fifteen minutes) to go the back way,” she adds.

Medical student Leonardo Elias reports, “The economic situation unfortunately is very poor. The state of the roads is so bad that goods cannot be moved. Prices are rising and this is forcing students out of university.” He also reports that the public violence and high crime rate is impacting severely.

The 2007 financial crisis flattened Guatemala tourism by 75%. Tourism is the economic mainstay of Panajachel and other Lake Atitlan communities.

Reports of cyberbacteria in Lake Atitlan the following year (when many parts of the lake turned red) had a further major impact on tourism.

“This has lead to low occupancy rates in Panajachel hotels, business failures, job losses, job sharing,” says businesswoman Patti Mort.

Patricia Gutierrez, the volunteer Guatemala administrator for CMS says, “Our scholarships were not meant to cover total student expenses, but now it is impossible for them to get part time jobs. They really are unable to help themselves.”

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Social Work Students Must Be Fund Raisers

Anastasia must equip a community kitchen or not graduate!

Anastacia Ajanel Xon will finish her degree this semester in Social Work studies at Mariano Galvez University in Solola. The road from Panajachel has been cut off by mudslides and will be closed for the next three months.

Anastacia’s drive for an education has been up hill all the way. She started working at nine years old. She is now 36.

She is bright and forthright. Anastacia speaks three different Mayan languages (Quiche, Tzutujil and Katchiquel); also she knows perfect Spanish and enough English too. She can call a spade in all the languages.

“As a little girl, my parents sent me to work. For many years I carried a baby on my back for 10 hours a day to earn a little money. I had to have faith by myself to open a real world for me,” she says.

Social Work is a major university degree. The top qualification requires the equivalent of a master’s, and that would mean another three years of study. But now Anastasia will be able to seek work.

Guatemalan university programs seem unlike any known to Canadians. Major research reports are required but with a Quatemala twist. The university assigns projects that require students to be fundraisers.

In the final semester, the student either produces or doesn’t graduate. Anasatasia’s university wanted her to raise and build a school classroom for a local village. It would cost $4000, a sum her family could not earn in two years of hard labour.

Anastacia managed to get the assignment changed and to find a sponsor for different assignment.

Her minor project was to equip a community kitchen. The cost totalled $453 CAD that Paso Por Paso/ Scholarships managed to cover.

“It was either that or lose our investment,” Roger Pretty says. ” We don’t always understand the Guatemalan approach. And we sometimes suspect deliberate road blocks put in the way of indigenous students. We hope that is not the case.”

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Jerry Smith dies June 10, 2010

PASO POR PASO and CANADA MAYA SCHOLARSHIPS suffer major loss of co-founder Jerry Smith

by R. Pretty

Apparently Jerry Smith died in his sleep the night of June 10. Oliva Lopez is one of the scholars Jerry recruited for a Canada Maya Scholarship; she saw him Thursday night. He looked tired and ill. When she went to check on him on Friday, he was gone.

The owner of Santander Rooms just off Calle Santander in Panajachel found Jerry Friday morning, informed the police, who then informed the American Embassy who then collected Jerry and the contents of his room.

Only a week ago Jerry offered to come to Canada on a fund raising tour for the scholarships. I am sorry he could make it.

See JERRY SMITH PAGE

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